Mandarin Hat

Blooming in Heathcote

While you’re visiting Heathcote and enjoying the 5 acres of Gardens, here are a few of the many flowers you can find blooming in January.

Mandarin Hat

This herbaceous perennial is a climbing shrub, native to the lowlands of the Himalayas and found in many Florida gardens. Holmskioldia sanguinea is also known as Mandarin Hat Plant (the name preferred in Southern Florida), Chinese Hat Plant or Cup-and-Saucer Plant. The 8 to 10 foot plant is irresistible to butterflies and hummingbirds.

Chocolate Cherry Allamanda

From Tropical South and Central America, these large plants have striking foliage and trumpet-shaped flowers which bloom nearly year-round at Heathcote. Allamanda is a genus of flowering plants in the dogbane family, Apocynaceae. The most common of the species produce yellow flowers. Allamanda attracts butterflies and hummingbirds, it’s resistant to deer and rabbits and grows well in full sun or in light shade. All parts of the plant are toxic if swallowed.

Glory Bower Vine

You may have a hard time finding this one at Heathcote as it is high up in the trees in our rainforest. Flaming glorybower, native to western Africa, is a woody or semi-woody evergreen vine or running shrub that climbs by twining and is popular in warm, humid climates. The flowers are extremely showy and attractive to butterflies.

31st Annual Garden Festival

31st Annual Garden Festival

Join us at Heathcote for the 31st Annual Garden Festival

NEW DATE FREE ADMISSION – SAVE THE DATE!
Saturday October 20th, 9:00 am – 4:00 pm
Sunday October 21st, 10:00 – 4:00 pm 

Mark your calendar! This year’s event has been moved ahead since it conflicted with other festivals and our preparation for the Garden of Lights.

This year’s Garden-Fest includes a variety of plant and flower vendors, garden supplies, garden arts & crafts, children’s activities, refreshments, demonstrations, entertainment and more.

Join us for our very popular annual garden festival and plant sale where you’ll find an exceptional selection of plants: Exotics, natives, tropicals, palms, orchids, herbs, garden art and accessories offered by vendors from across the state—children’s activities, food and more. Get advice, ask questions or stop by to chat.

Vendors you can look forward to seeing at this year’s event are:

Sponsoring an event at Heathcote

Our event sponsors help fund the Gardens’ year-round programs and furthers the organization’s mission to educate and inspire by providing a place of beauty and a resource for the conservation of our environment.

Your information will be listed in the program, on the website, social media and signage at the event.
1/4 pg. ad $50, 1/2 pg. ad $100, full page $200, inside or outside back cover $250

For more information on sponsoring events at Heathcote call: 772-464-4672
Email: dkimes@heathcotebg.org

Red in the Gardens

The Gardens are looking lovely and there is a wonderful assortment of “red” (or close to it) throughout the grounds right now.

From the red Amaryllus in the parking lot, to the blooming Bougainvilla in the Bonsai Garden, there are many beautiful plants and flowers to find everywhere.

Fun Facts:

Guzmanija lingulata: The genus was discovered in 1802 and named after the Spanish botanist A. Gusman.
Amaryllus: Cultivation of amaryllis started in the 18th century. There are more than 600 varieties of amaryllis today. South Africa and Holland are among the greatest manufacturers of amaryllis in the world.

Philodendron: Always allow the top 50% of the soil to dry out before watering.

Eucrosia bicolor: Native to Ecuador and Peru. This species grows very well in tropical climates. It was the first species of Eucrosia to be scientifically described, in 1816, and the first to be introduced into cultivation in Europe, flowering outside its homeland for the first time in 1817.

Crown of Thorns: Currently, all varieties are listed on Appendix II of the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species (CITES), meaning that international trade in wild grown plants should be carefully monitored.

Billbergia pyramidalis: Commonly known as the Flaming torch, is a species of bromeliad that is native to Brazil, Venezuela, French Guiana, the Lesser Antilles and Cuba. When planted at the base of a tree, they slowly will climb the trunk.

Bougainvilla: The beautiful bougainvilla is listed as one of the top 10 flowering bonsai trees to grow. Discovered in Brazil during French Adm. Louis de Bougainvillea’s 1768 voyage, these plants were named in his honor.

Neoregelia Aztec: This tropical epiphyte thrives with humidity, often going two weeks without supplemental water.

Desert Rose: It has no thorns and it is totally unrelated to the rose family – it doesn’t really even look like one.

Heathcote Herb Society

Coffee: Thursday, March 22, 2018, 9:30 a.m. – 11:00 a.m.

Heathcote’s herb collection includes many specimens of Salvias, as well as rare and exotic plants. Call to register: 772-464-4672

Join us to kick off Heathcote Herb Society on Thursday, March 21 at 9:30 am. Enjoy a continental breakfast with herb-infused breads. Learn about the origins of Heathcote’s Herb Garden and its rare and unusual salvias. Spearheaded by Karen Gottwald, our goal is to reinvigorate the Society formed in 1994 after an herb gardening workshop brought together a diverse cadre of herb lovers.

If you are interested in joining but cannot attend Thursday’s Coffee, please let us know by calling 772-464-4672 and will add you to the List for future events and activities.

Heathcote’s Gardener, Miriam Charles, was a founding member of the Herb Society. She will share how she seeks out rare and unusual herbs and starts many of them from seed. Miriam’s particular interest is in Salvias, and you will find many lovely specimens in the Herb Garden and in Heathcote’s Color Beds.

The herbs in Heathcote’s Garden range from culinary to medicinal. Some are also sources of dyes and ornamental dried bouquets. Yarrow, Rosemary, Pennyroyal and Lavender, and the seed heads of Dill and Fennel make nice dried arrangements. Basil and Bay, in addition to their culinary uses, symbolize friendship and loyalty. Geraniums are for comfort and, of course, Rosemary is for remembrance. You may also be familiar with Rose Hips as being a source of Vitamin C. Culinary herbs provided the inspiration for the Herb Society’s cookbook, Heathcote Gems: Herb Inspired Recipes, which is available in the Gift Shop.

St. Fiacre

St. Fiacre

The statue in the Herb Garden is a representation of St. Fiacre (pron. Fee-ah-kruh), an Irish monk whose feast is celebrated in Ireland and France on September 1st. He is the patron saint of gardeners (and taxi-drivers and florists among other things).

During the Dark Ages, monasteries were repositories of learning, and it was there that Fiacre became skilled at the use of healing herbs. Bishop Faro, viewed Fiacre’s act as a gift from God and proclaimed it a miracle.

 

Tea in the Gardens

A Wonderful Afternoon Tea Party and Auction

Vintage linens and china, delicious food including a variety of tea sandwiches, shortbread, and of course, something chocolate.

  • Sunday, April 15 at 1 PM – 3 PM
  • Sponsorships and program ads available. Items for auction now being accepted.
  • Volunteers needed.

 

Tickets Available Online
$40 Individuals – $150 Table of four – $300 Table of four with Champagne
R.S.V.P. by April 1, 2018. Limited Seating

Tea Lore

Each of us, whether broken or whole, is empowered by tea. There is more to this drink than just the leaves…

Tea brings us in closer touch with ourselves. It provides peaceful moments to reflect on our life’s chapters as they unfold, and it allows us to be intimate with friends, co-workers and loved ones.

I see sipping tea…as a bridge that united me to a wide variety of people. When we site down with a cup of tea…we commune spiritually with fellow drinkers all over the world.

What’s wonderful about the tea celebration is that teach of us may bring to it our own tradition and personal preferences.

~Alexandra Stoddaard in “Tea Celebrations”

Bone China

Bone China was invented in England in the mid 18th century, and it keeps the tea hot! These cups were so expensive that women carried their own cup and saucer in a special box.

Some tea drinkers know that clay teapots can alter the taste and flavor of tea. However, very few may pay attention to the effect which the cup you drink out of can also alter the taste.

In a taste test experiment conducted by Akira Hojo, using bone China, porcelain and glass cups, Hojo found that the bone China clearly increased the body, while the porcelain decreased it. On the contrary, the porcelain increased the after taste. The glass tea cup gave the body and after taste results in between porcelain and bone China.

Tea Bags

These handy items were actually invented in 1826, they’re not just a modern convenience.

Milk in Tea

Put it in first! Tradition has it that the English were afraid the hot tea would crack the cup. Also, by putting milk in first, you will never fill the cup too full.

Gardening 411

Garden Festival Schedule of Events

Join us at Heathcote this weekend for the
30th Annual Garden Festival

This year’s Garden-Fest includes a variety of plant and flower vendors, garden supplies, garden arts & crafts, children’s activities, refreshments, demonstrations and more.

Visitors will gain insights of conservation efforts and take away ideas that can be put to work in their home gardens.

Get advice, ask questions or stop by to chat. Ask the experts!

  • All sessions will take place in the Pioneer House unless noted. 

SATURDAY events 9:00 am – 4:00 pm

9:30 am – Creating a Florida Friendly Landscape – Life After Lawn – Kate Rotindo
10:00 am – What’s up with a Watershed? (Children’s Activities) – Robert Pike
11:00 am – Post-Hurricane Landscape Issues – Kate Rotindo
12:30 – Attracting Pollinators and Propagators to your Garden – Ann Marie Loveridge
                 President, Florida Native Plant Society, Lakola’s Mint Chapter
2:00 pm – Creating a Florida Friendly Landscape – Kate Rotindo

SUNDAY events 10:00 am – 4:00 pm

10:00 am – What’s up with a Watershed? (Children’s Activities) – Robert Pike
Noon – Planting a Butterfly Garden with Florida Natives – Ann Marie Loveridge
1:30 pm – Care and Maintenance of Bonsai Trimming demonstration – Seth Nelson
                      Heathcote Botanical Gardens Bonsai Curator

FREE ADMISSION – Call: 772-464-4672 for more information.

Hurricane Irma Debris

Hurricane Irma Debris Statistics

According to Martin County Florida’s website, Hurricane Irma generated the equivalent of a year and a half’s worth of debris, or nearly 150,000 cubic yards.

In Indian River County’s unincorporated areas, it is estimated there was enough created to fill a truck more than 6 miles long.

The St. Lucie County Solid Waste Division expected to collect 50,000 cubic yards of materials when all totaled. The City of Port St. Lucie originally estimated that Hurricane Irma left about 70,000 cubic yards, or 19,000 tons, of vegetative debris. That amount has already been collected, therefore the estimates have been revised. The City now estimates Hurricane Irma left 110,000 cubic yards, or 29,700 tons, of vegetative debris. City residents can track the collection status on this zone map.

Harder-hit Collier County may haul off up to 10 million cubic yards

Crews are working hard to collect this vegetative debris in all residential areas of the unincorporated Counties, including private and gated communities.

Multiple passes of hurricane debris collection will occur in all areas.

Martin County officials expect the project’s collection phase to wrap up by October 31, 2017.

Martin County residents can track the status of debris collection in all geographic zones via Martin County’s “Debris Completion Map”.