Vanda and Cattlea Orchids

Vanda and Cattleya Orchids

Like any other plant, orchids require light, correct temperature ranges, humidity, water and feeding. Orchids are variable in their light requirements depending on genera and variety.

The Vanda was first discovered in 1613 by Alvin Semedo and the name Vanda comes from the Sanskrit word for orchid. Vandas do not need soil to grow, in fact, potting them in soil would cause their roots to rot. The Vanda orchid’s natural habitat is tropical. They require a very high level of humidity and light shade is needed. You will be able to determine just how much light your Vanda orchid requires by identifying the type of leaves your orchid has.

There are 3 types of Vanda orchids, each with a different type of leaf. The first type is the strap-leaf (broad, flat leaves), the second type is terete (round, pencil-like leaves), and the third is semi-terete (hybrid of strap-leaf & terete leaf). Terete leaf Vandas need full sun, semi-terete leaf Vandas need a bit less sun, and strap-leaf Vandas need even a little less light.

Cattleya orchids originate from Central and South America and were named for the English orchid collector William Cattleya. They have been widely hybridized, resulting in a large variety of colors and forms. Cattleyas thrive with humid conditions and in medium light. In hot weather, keep them shaded sufficiently ensuring the leaves are cool to the touch. If a Cattleya orchid is kept in excessively moist conditions, disease and rot can set in which will cause damage to the plant.

There are a number of orchids blooming in our rainforest right now, stop in and check them out.

Ground Cover

Alternatives to Turf

Turning Problem Spaces into Featured Places

Tuesday, October 10, 2017 12:00 p.m. – 1:00 p.m.

Kate Rotindo

Kate Rotindo

Tired of high maintenance lawns? A beautiful lawn can be an appealing part of your home landscape, but sometimes turf-grass doesn’t perform as well as you would like. A variety of ground covers and plants can be used to replace these areas.

Ground covers are low-growing plants used within a landscape. Selecting which types of plants are appropriate for you depends on a variety of factors (e.g., location within your yard, soil conditions, etc.).

This workshop will cover how to choose plants and ground covers that are appealing to the eyes and take little effort.

Presented by Kate Rotindo, Urban Horticulture Agent for St. Lucie County UF-IFAS.

Free to HBG members and master gardeners; Regular admission price for non-members.
Feel free to bring a brown bag lunch.
Call to register: 772-464-4672

After Hurricane Irma

Helping Hands Needed For Irma Cleanup

Our treasured Heathcote Gardens made it through Irma but its fairly battered and bruised. There are a lot of trees down and and debris everywhere! There’s a lot of cleanup to be done and many hands lighten the load.

The silver lining is that our historic Heathcote House still stands. Regarding the James J. Smith Tropical Bonsai Collection, bonsai curator Seth Nelson and his friend Juan Andrade had moved many of the trees into the Pavilion and onto the ground away from falling limbs to prepare for the storm. It survived fairly well but will definitely require some tender loving care. The bonsai in the Japanese Garden did not fare as well and ended up with some toppled stanchions and broken pots.

If you can spare any time, treasure or have a special talent to help get our beautiful Gardens reopened, please join us!

Bring your gloves, a hat and you’ll be welcomed with open arms!

To offer any help or assistance with the cleanup, please call us at 772-464-4672




Our heartfelt thanks for your continued support!!!

Wednesday’s volunteers were very busy with a big task at hand to say the least!

Garden Festival Vendors

30th Annual Garden Festival

Garden Festival 2017

 

The 30th Annual Fall Garden Fest (yes, thirty years!) will be held on November 18th & 19th!

Join us for our very popular annual garden festival and plant sale where you’ll find an exceptional selection of plants, flowers, herbs, garden tools, supplies and much more.

Get advice, ask questions or stop by to chat. Ask the experts!
Attend any or all of our Gardening 411 activities.

FREE admission  Saturday 9:00 am – 4:00 pm, Sunday 10:00 am – 4:00 pm

This year’s festival Vendors will include: Tropiflora, LLC. and Odom’s Orchids, Inc. as well as Akamia Accents, Atizana Inspired, D & D Growers, D.R. Bates Liners & Gallons, Doctor Kirchner-Natural Weed Killer, The Garden Market, J & P Nursery, Johns Jungle, Liquid Gold Natural Honey Products, Orchids in Bloom, Our Vital Earth, Inc., Peter’s Croton  & Cordylines Nursery, Soil mates Garden Expressions andTreasure Coast Bee Keepers.

Our Non-profit partners include:  St Lucie County Master Gardeners, Treasure Coast African Violet Society, Treasure Coast Junior Master Gardeners, Treasure Coast WoodTurners Guild, and University Of Florida Biological Control Research & Containment Laboratory.
Kid’s Activities and lots of food. Come and join in the fun!

Check out this year’s schedule of events: HERE

  • Vendors interested in participating can get more information HERE
  • Interested in volunteering? We always need new Co-Horts! Find out more HERE
Restroom Facelift

I Spy…Volunteers in July

There’s been a frenzy of activity at Heathcote. Volunteers, visitors, workshops and more.

July saw a caladium workshop, volunteers giving the restrooms a new paint-job, fence repair, preparation for Heathcote’s Showdown on the Green Charity Golf Tournament and campers learning about the watershed to name a few.

Our Co-Hort volunteers and a generous community of supporters continue to help steward the mission of Heathcote Botanical Gardens to preserve this beloved community asset for today and future generations.

In 2016, Co-Horts racked up more than 12,700 hours dedicated to fulfilling HBG‘s mission! We always have room for more, to learn how you can help, check out our volunteer page, membership page, or make a donation.

Caladium Workshop

Caladium Workshop – July 8th

The Hotter the Better!

Learn how to apply tropical colors to your summer garden!

White Queen Caladium

White Queen Caladium

Caladium Workshop, Sat. July 8 , 9:30 am – 11:00 am
$10 for Heathcote members
$15 for non-members
Presented by Merry Savoy

Caladiums, grown for their colorful foliage, are tropical plants that originated in the Amazon basin of South America. Caladiums are grown from tubers, commonly referred to as bulbs and are widely used in landscapes and home gardens in the south where the hot growing conditions are very favorable.
You will see numerous varieties of Caladium when you visit Heathcote such as: White Queen, Florida Moonlight, White Christmas, Fannie Munson, Miss Muffet and Cranberry Star to name a few.
Come join us and learn the history and horticulture of these spectacular heat-loving tuberous plants. Participants will plant and take home a container and additional bulbs will be for sale.

 


Register




Reservations: 772-464-4672

Heathcote Botanical Gardens
210 Savannah Road, Fort Pierce

Citrus Psyllid Research Garden

Did You Know…

There’s a new research garden at Heathcote!

Ladybug at Heathcote

Ladybug at Heathcote

Insect predators like the lady beetle don’t just eat pest insects; they eat a lot of nectar and pollen, too. The nutrients from pollen and nectar help them when prey insects are scarce, for reproduction, and while moving between habitats.

Joe Patt, an entomologist from the USDA Agricultural Research Service is conducting a study at Heathcote to determine if certain plants, like wild poinsettia, can be used to attract and nourish the natural enemies (like ladybugs) of the Asian citrus psyllid (pronounced ‘sil-id’). The psyllid is a tiny insect that transmits the bacterium (HLB) that causes citrus greening disease. HLB is fatal and killing citrus trees across Florida and Texas.

By itself the psyllid is not too harmful but it can carry a bacterial organism that causes huanglongbing or HLB disease and that can kill citrus trees.UC Agriculture and Natural Resources Entomologist
Beth Grafton-Cardwell
citrus psyllid

citrus psyllid

If you have citrus trees and are curious to see if psyllid are present, Grafton-Cardwell says tree owners can take a magnifying glass outside and look at new growth for small yellow eggs, sesame-seed sized yellow bugs, white curly tubules or aphid-like adults that perch with their hind legs up in the air.

The economic damage HLB has caused in Florida alone is alarming. According to University of Florida research, the disease cost the State more than $4.5 billion in lost citrus production. It led to more than 8,200 lost jobs in the 2006/07 – 2010/11 production seasons.

USDA research garden

USDA research garden at Heathcote

A number of USDA-ARS scientists among the three research units at the U.S. Horticultural Research Laboratory in Fort Pierce, Florida, are conducting research in search of solutions to the huanglongbing problem. Let’s hope this research produces some encouraging results.