After Hurricane Irma

Helping Hands Needed For Irma Cleanup

Our treasured Heathcote Gardens made it through Irma but its fairly battered and bruised. There are a lot of trees down and and debris everywhere! There’s a lot of cleanup to be done and many hands lighten the load.

The silver lining is that our historic Heathcote House still stands. Regarding the James J. Smith Tropical Bonsai Collection, bonsai curator Seth Nelson and his friend Juan Andrade had moved many of the trees into the Pavilion and onto the ground away from falling limbs to prepare for the storm. It survived fairly well but will definitely require some tender loving care. The bonsai in the Japanese Garden did not fare as well and ended up with some toppled stanchions and broken pots.

If you can spare any time, treasure or have a special talent to help get our beautiful Gardens reopened, please join us!

Bring your gloves, a hat and you’ll be welcome with open arms!

To offer any help or assistance with the cleanup, please call us at 772-464-4672




Our heartfelt thanks for your continued support!!!

Wednesday’s volunteers were very busy with a big task at hand to say the least!

Restroom Facelift

I Spy…Volunteers in July

There’s been a frenzy of activity at Heathcote. Volunteers, visitors, workshops and more.

July saw a caladium workshop, volunteers giving the restrooms a new paint-job, fence repair, preparation for Heathcote’s Showdown on the Green Charity Golf Tournament and campers learning about the watershed to name a few.

Our Co-Hort volunteers and a generous community of supporters continue to help steward the mission of Heathcote Botanical Gardens to preserve this beloved community asset for today and future generations.

In 2016, Co-Horts racked up more than 12,700 hours dedicated to fulfilling HBG‘s mission! We always have room for more, to learn how you can help, check out our volunteer page, membership page, or make a donation.

Caladium Workshop

Caladium Workshop – July 8th

The Hotter the Better!

Learn how to apply tropical colors to your summer garden!

White Queen Caladium

White Queen Caladium

Caladium Workshop, Sat. July 8 , 9:30 am – 11:00 am
$10 for Heathcote members
$15 for non-members
Presented by Merry Savoy

Caladiums, grown for their colorful foliage, are tropical plants that originated in the Amazon basin of South America. Caladiums are grown from tubers, commonly referred to as bulbs and are widely used in landscapes and home gardens in the south where the hot growing conditions are very favorable.
You will see numerous varieties of Caladium when you visit Heathcote such as: White Queen, Florida Moonlight, White Christmas, Fannie Munson, Miss Muffet and Cranberry Star to name a few.
Come join us and learn the history and horticulture of these spectacular heat-loving tuberous plants. Participants will plant and take home a container and additional bulbs will be for sale.

 


Register




Reservations: 772-464-4672

Heathcote Botanical Gardens
210 Savannah Road, Fort Pierce

Citrus Psyllid Research Garden

Did You Know…

There’s a new research garden at Heathcote!

Ladybug at Heathcote

Ladybug at Heathcote

Insect predators like the lady beetle don’t just eat pest insects; they eat a lot of nectar and pollen, too. The nutrients from pollen and nectar help them when prey insects are scarce, for reproduction, and while moving between habitats.

Joe Patt, an entomologist from the USDA Agricultural Research Service is conducting a study at Heathcote to determine if certain plants, like wild poinsettia, can be used to attract and nourish the natural enemies (like ladybugs) of the Asian citrus psyllid (pronounced ‘sil-id’). The psyllid is a tiny insect that transmits the bacterium (HLB) that causes citrus greening disease. HLB is fatal and killing citrus trees across Florida and Texas.

By itself the psyllid is not too harmful but it can carry a bacterial organism that causes huanglongbing or HLB disease and that can kill citrus trees.UC Agriculture and Natural Resources Entomologist
Beth Grafton-Cardwell
citrus psyllid

citrus psyllid

If you have citrus trees and are curious to see if psyllid are present, Grafton-Cardwell says tree owners can take a magnifying glass outside and look at new growth for small yellow eggs, sesame-seed sized yellow bugs, white curly tubules or aphid-like adults that perch with their hind legs up in the air.

The economic damage HLB has caused in Florida alone is alarming. According to University of Florida research, the disease cost the State more than $4.5 billion in lost citrus production. It led to more than 8,200 lost jobs in the 2006/07 – 2010/11 production seasons.

USDA research garden

USDA research garden at Heathcote

A number of USDA-ARS scientists among the three research units at the U.S. Horticultural Research Laboratory in Fort Pierce, Florida, are conducting research in search of solutions to the huanglongbing problem. Let’s hope this research produces some encouraging results.

Monarch Butterfly

Blooming in the Butterfly Garden

Planting a butterfly garden is a great way to beautify your yard and help attract many of the different butterflies found in Florida. Most butterfly gardens are also a magnet for hummingbirds and beneficial insects. A productive butterfly garden does not require a large land area—even a few key plants can make a huge impact.

To generate a list of host plants for a specific area, visit Florida Native Plant Society’s website.

Here are a few of the plants currently blooming in Heathcote’s butterfly garden.

There are more than 765 species of butterflies found in North America north of Mexico. Florida boasts over 180 verified butterfly species representing some 170 native or newly established species and 17 tropical vagrants. Within that mix, around 40 are considered either unique to the state or occur mostly within its boundaries. This diverse butterfly fauna is the highest of any state east of the Mississippi River and helps make Florida a premier location for butterfly gardeners.

Butterfly information from document WEC 22, one of a series of the Wildlife Ecology and Conservation Department, UF/IFAS Extension. Original publication date December 1990. Revised February 2008. Reviewed October 2014. Visit the EDIS website at http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu.

Founding women members: Jan Bals, Laura Baker, Gloria Moore, Norma Carsens, Peggy Berg

Heathcote’s Founding Women

The Founding Women Members

Jan Bals, Laura Baker, Gloria Moore, Norma Carsens, Peggy Berg

For Women’s History Month we are highlighting the important women who were the founding members of what we now know as Heathcote Botanical Gardens.

Originally a plant nursery on Heathcote Street in Scarsdale, New York, the business was transplanted to Florida and in 1960 moved from the original Florida location on West Orange Avenue to its current Fort Pierce site on Savannah Road by its owners Jim and Mollie Crimmins.

When the Crimmins retired, they put the property up for sale. A group of very determined ladies in a local garden club led by Gloria Moore, Chris Haynes, Jan Bals, Norma Carsens, Laura Baker, Gloria Rooks and Peggy Berg saw the unique beauty of the spot and worked hard to preserve it as a public botanical garden.

Heathcote Botanical Gardens, Inc. was incorporated in 1985 as a non-profit; and in 1986 the property was purchased with private donations raised by Heathcote Botanical Gardens, Inc., and grants from the state, county, and city.

Without these great women Heathcote Botanical Gardens would not be what it is today. The non-profit continues to maintain and operate the Gardens and carry forward its mission.

the art of bonsai

Learning the Art of Bonsai

Register now and learn about the ancient artistry of Bonsai at this workshop by Heathcote’s Bonsai Curator, Seth Nelson; introducing audiences to the delicate convergence of nature and creative expression.

Saturday, April 1, 2017 10:30 am.

Members $10; Non–members $20.
RSVP 772.464.4672

Page 2 of 512345