Hurricane Irma Debris

Hurricane Irma Debris Statistics

According to Martin County Florida’s website, Hurricane Irma generated the equivalent of a year and a half’s worth of debris, or nearly 150,000 cubic yards.

In Indian River County’s unincorporated areas, it is estimated there was enough created to fill a truck more than 6 miles long.

The St. Lucie County Solid Waste Division expected to collect 50,000 cubic yards of materials when all totaled. The City of Port St. Lucie originally estimated that Hurricane Irma left about 70,000 cubic yards, or 19,000 tons, of vegetative debris. That amount has already been collected, therefore the estimates have been revised. The City now estimates Hurricane Irma left 110,000 cubic yards, or 29,700 tons, of vegetative debris. City residents can track the collection status on this zone map.

Harder-hit Collier County may haul off up to 10 million cubic yards

Crews are working hard to collect this vegetative debris in all residential areas of the unincorporated Counties, including private and gated communities.

Multiple passes of hurricane debris collection will occur in all areas.

Martin County officials expect the project’s collection phase to wrap up by October 31, 2017.

Martin County residents can track the status of debris collection in all geographic zones via Martin County’s “Debris Completion Map”.

Founding women members: Jan Bals, Laura Baker, Gloria Moore, Norma Carsens, Peggy Berg

Heathcote’s Founding Women

The Founding Women Members

Jan Bals, Laura Baker, Gloria Moore, Norma Carsens, Peggy Berg

For Women’s History Month we are highlighting the important women who were the founding members of what we now know as Heathcote Botanical Gardens.

Originally a plant nursery on Heathcote Street in Scarsdale, New York, the business was transplanted to Florida and in 1960 moved from the original Florida location on West Orange Avenue to its current Fort Pierce site on Savannah Road by its owners Jim and Mollie Crimmins.

When the Crimmins retired, they put the property up for sale. A group of very determined ladies in a local garden club led by Gloria Moore, Chris Haynes, Jan Bals, Norma Carsens, Laura Baker, Gloria Rooks and Peggy Berg saw the unique beauty of the spot and worked hard to preserve it as a public botanical garden.

Heathcote Botanical Gardens, Inc. was incorporated in 1985 as a non-profit; and in 1986 the property was purchased with private donations raised by Heathcote Botanical Gardens, Inc., and grants from the state, county, and city.

Without these great women Heathcote Botanical Gardens would not be what it is today. The non-profit continues to maintain and operate the Gardens and carry forward its mission.

In Memory of James J. Smith

On June 30th, we were informed that James J. Smith, Bonsai Master, had passed away.
In 2009 Jim gave Heathcote Botanical Gardens a generous gift of one hundred tropical bonsai, making Heathcote Botanical Gardens the site of the largest public collection of tropical bonsai in the United States.
jimsmith
 He will be missed by Heathcote as well as the Bonsai community.

Heathcote extends condolences to the family and friends of the world-renowned Bonsai Master Jim Smith.

Arrangements are in the process and will be announced when they are finalized.