Gardening 411

Garden Festival Schedule of Events

Join us at Heathcote this weekend for the
30th Annual Garden Festival

This year’s Garden-Fest includes a variety of plant and flower vendors, garden supplies, garden arts & crafts, children’s activities, refreshments, demonstrations and more.

Visitors will gain insights of conservation efforts and take away ideas that can be put to work in their home gardens.

Get advice, ask questions or stop by to chat. Ask the experts!

  • All sessions will take place in the Pioneer House unless noted. 

SATURDAY events 9:00 am – 4:00 pm

9:30 am – Creating a Florida Friendly Landscape – Life After Lawn – Kate Rotindo
10:00 am – What’s up with a Watershed? (Children’s Activities) – Robert Pike
11:00 am – Post-Hurricane Landscape Issues – Kate Rotindo
12:30 – Attracting Pollinators and Propagators to your Garden – Ann Marie Loveridge
                 President, Florida Native Plant Society, Lakola’s Mint Chapter
2:00 pm – Creating a Florida Friendly Landscape – Kate Rotindo

SUNDAY events 10:00 am – 4:00 pm

10:00 am – What’s up with a Watershed? (Children’s Activities) – Robert Pike
Noon – Planting a Butterfly Garden with Florida Natives – Ann Marie Loveridge
1:30 pm – Care and Maintenance of Bonsai Trimming demonstration – Seth Nelson
                      Heathcote Botanical Gardens Bonsai Curator

FREE ADMISSION – Call: 772-464-4672 for more information.

Hurricane Irma Debris

Hurricane Irma Debris Statistics

According to Martin County Florida’s website, Hurricane Irma generated the equivalent of a year and a half’s worth of debris, or nearly 150,000 cubic yards.

In Indian River County’s unincorporated areas, it is estimated there was enough created to fill a truck more than 6 miles long.

The St. Lucie County Solid Waste Division expected to collect 50,000 cubic yards of materials when all totaled. The City of Port St. Lucie originally estimated that Hurricane Irma left about 70,000 cubic yards, or 19,000 tons, of vegetative debris. That amount has already been collected, therefore the estimates have been revised. The City now estimates Hurricane Irma left 110,000 cubic yards, or 29,700 tons, of vegetative debris. City residents can track the collection status on this zone map.

Harder-hit Collier County may haul off up to 10 million cubic yards

Crews are working hard to collect this vegetative debris in all residential areas of the unincorporated Counties, including private and gated communities.

Multiple passes of hurricane debris collection will occur in all areas.

Martin County officials expect the project’s collection phase to wrap up by October 31, 2017.

Martin County residents can track the status of debris collection in all geographic zones via Martin County’s “Debris Completion Map”.

Vanda and Cattlea Orchids

Vanda and Cattleya Orchids

Like any other plant, orchids require light, correct temperature ranges, humidity, water and feeding. Orchids are variable in their light requirements depending on genera and variety.

The Vanda was first discovered in 1613 by Alvin Semedo and the name Vanda comes from the Sanskrit word for orchid. Vandas do not need soil to grow, in fact, potting them in soil would cause their roots to rot. The Vanda orchid’s natural habitat is tropical. They require a very high level of humidity and light shade is needed. You will be able to determine just how much light your Vanda orchid requires by identifying the type of leaves your orchid has.

There are 3 types of Vanda orchids, each with a different type of leaf. The first type is the strap-leaf (broad, flat leaves), the second type is terete (round, pencil-like leaves), and the third is semi-terete (hybrid of strap-leaf & terete leaf). Terete leaf Vandas need full sun, semi-terete leaf Vandas need a bit less sun, and strap-leaf Vandas need even a little less light.

Cattleya orchids originate from Central and South America and were named for the English orchid collector William Cattleya. They have been widely hybridized, resulting in a large variety of colors and forms. Cattleyas thrive with humid conditions and in medium light. In hot weather, keep them shaded sufficiently ensuring the leaves are cool to the touch. If a Cattleya orchid is kept in excessively moist conditions, disease and rot can set in which will cause damage to the plant.

There are a number of orchids blooming in our rainforest right now, stop in and check them out.

Ground Cover

Alternatives to Turf

Turning Problem Spaces into Featured Places

Tuesday, October 10, 2017 12:00 p.m. – 1:00 p.m.

Kate Rotindo

Kate Rotindo

Tired of high maintenance lawns? A beautiful lawn can be an appealing part of your home landscape, but sometimes turf-grass doesn’t perform as well as you would like. A variety of ground covers and plants can be used to replace these areas.

Ground covers are low-growing plants used within a landscape. Selecting which types of plants are appropriate for you depends on a variety of factors (e.g., location within your yard, soil conditions, etc.).

This workshop will cover how to choose plants and ground covers that are appealing to the eyes and take little effort.

Presented by Kate Rotindo, Urban Horticulture Agent for St. Lucie County UF-IFAS.

Free to HBG members and master gardeners; Regular admission price for non-members.
Feel free to bring a brown bag lunch.
Call to register: 772-464-4672

After Hurricane Irma

Helping Hands Needed For Irma Cleanup

Our treasured Heathcote Gardens made it through Irma but its fairly battered and bruised. There are a lot of trees down and and debris everywhere! There’s a lot of cleanup to be done and many hands lighten the load.

The silver lining is that our historic Heathcote House still stands. Regarding the James J. Smith Tropical Bonsai Collection, bonsai curator Seth Nelson and his friend Juan Andrade had moved many of the trees into the Pavilion and onto the ground away from falling limbs to prepare for the storm. It survived fairly well but will definitely require some tender loving care. The bonsai in the Japanese Garden did not fare as well and ended up with some toppled stanchions and broken pots.

If you can spare any time, treasure or have a special talent to help get our beautiful Gardens reopened, please join us!

Bring your gloves, a hat and you’ll be welcome with open arms!

To offer any help or assistance with the cleanup, please call us at 772-464-4672




Our heartfelt thanks for your continued support!!!

Wednesday’s volunteers were very busy with a big task at hand to say the least!

Bonsai Repotting Workshop

Bonsai Repotting Workshop

Bonsai need to be regularly repotted, especially younger bonsai (under 10 yrs. old) due to various factors: their pots become root bound; soil runs out of nutrients and imbalances of salt and Ph levels occur etc. Repotting will help to correct this and enable the bonsai to reach its full potential with fresh growing medium and pruning overgrown or excessive roots.

Apart from watering, repotting is probably one of the most important and misunderstood processes. It is also a good time to thin your plant’s foliage mass to help reduce the stress on the bonsai.

Heathcote’s bonsai curator Seth Nelson will show you when you should repot, how to repot, what you need to repot your bonsai, and much more.

Feel free to bring your own tree and a pot that you’d like to work with and learn step-by-step as you go.

Saturday, September 30th: 10 AM – 11:30 AM

$10 for members, $20 for non-members
Call to register: 772-464-4672

Images from adamaskwhy.com

Garden Festival Vendors

30th Annual Garden Festival

Garden Festival 2017

 

The 30th Annual Fall Garden Fest (yes, thirty years!) will be held on November 18th & 19th!

Join us for our very popular annual garden festival and plant sale where you’ll find an exceptional selection of plants, flowers, herbs, garden tools, supplies and much more.

Get advice, ask questions or stop by to chat. Ask the experts!
Attend any or all of our Gardening 411 activities.

FREE admission  Saturday 9:00 am – 4:00 pm, Sunday 10:00 am – 4:00 pm

This year’s festival Vendors will include: Tropiflora, LLC. and Odom’s Orchids, Inc. as well as Akamia Accents, Atizana Inspired, D & D Growers, D.R. Bates Liners & Gallons, Doctor Kirchner-Natural Weed Killer, The Garden Market, J & P Nursery, Johns Jungle, Liquid Gold Natural Honey Products, Orchids in Bloom, Our Vital Earth, Inc., Peter’s Croton  & Cordylines Nursery, Soil mates Garden Expressions andTreasure Coast Bee Keepers.

Our Non-profit partners include:  St Lucie County Master Gardeners, Treasure Coast African Violet Society, Treasure Coast Junior Master Gardeners, Treasure Coast WoodTurners Guild, and University Of Florida Biological Control Research & Containment Laboratory.
Kid’s Activities and lots of food. Come and join in the fun!

Check out this year’s schedule of events: HERE

  • Vendors interested in participating can get more information HERE
  • Interested in volunteering? We always need new Co-Horts! Find out more HERE
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